I Pledge Not To Cheat

August 18th, 2008
By

In case you haven't heard, Hawaii is/was well represented in the Little League World Series from the famed Little League division (Waipio 11-12 year olds) to the Junior League division (Hilo 13-14 year olds) and last but not least in the Senior League divison (Pearl City 14-16 year olds).

Pearl City came up short failing to qualify for the semi's. Hilo did make us proud and made it to the World Series but fell to Curacao 5-2 in a very exciting game with the tying run at home. Hilo's power hitter cracked a deep shot to the warning track for the final out - literally inches short of a home run. And of course our Waipio Little Leaguers... still alive and guaranteed a spot in the US semifinals beginning Wednesday trying to repeat what the Ewa Beach Little Leaguers did just three years ago.

In Sunday's game, Waipio beat Florida 10-2  and it was the first Little League division game I seen this year (had the DVR set in case I missed this one and I'm glad I didn't - heckuva game!) but one thing I noticed in particular was the bright yellow patch above the normal Little League patch on the left arm:

Photobucket

In case you can't make it out it says, "I WON'T CHEAT!"

Wassap Wit Dat!

Granted the past handful of years have gone with some speculation and guilty teams of having ineligible players playing but it isn't the players who cheated... it was the coaches/adults/parents!!!

I cannot believe that the Little League would have a patch like that so brazenly sewn on the arms of the keiki when the kuleana solely goes to the adults. The parents should be aware of the district and age requirements. The coaches review the applications. The director(s) review the roster compliance's.

What does da keiki do but suit up and play where the parents sign them up to play? A keiki doesn't know how to cheat.

A keiki learns to cheat from the adults wanting their kid to shine. A keiki learns little "dirty" tricks from people who show them. A keiki mimics the attitude and sportsmanship display of those who are with them hours on end.

I was curious as to why the patch is on. Nothing from the commentators - which is rare because stories of interest are usually repeated throughout several games - and believe it or not, nothing from the Little League site(s) themselves (I've tried searching and Google'ing for over an hour). All I could find was that it's part of a program started by former major league slugger Dale Murphy inline with his foundations slogan of "Injecting Ethics into America's Future" and that was on some San Diego forum.

Unless the whole idea of the patch is for keiki to "step up to the plate" and recognize what is right an wrong then act accordingly?

In my 15 years of coaching I've seen the gamut of coaches from those who don't know anything about the sport but coach to help out to coaches who only care about the "W" but following the rules solely rests on the shoulders of the coach.

I for one have experienced a few incidences where there have been ineligible players playing against us. Parents actually forge their son's birth certificate or use the infamous "aunty or grandparents address" so they can play. I have turned away players because they were "out of district" and referred them to the proper team or those who missed the cutoff date by one day (yes, it has happended to me three times) I had to say sorry, no can even after they plead their case.

There are also times where the rules are a little gray - and people push those quite often - but if a morally right person were to follow the intent, there would be no gray.

Too bad the world doesn't work that way.

It reminds me of the Scarlett Letter... only the "letter" is on the wrong person.

 

DA PIDGIN WORD OF DA DAY! -
(as quoted from Da Kine Dictionary & Pidgin To Da Max… wit a Braddah Lance twist)

KULEANA
(koo lei AH na)

Haole Translation: Responsibility, job

Use: To point out one's responsibility or duty

Sentence: “It's da coaches kuleana fo' make sure da team legit.”

Sentence: “It's da keiki's kuleana fo' get to practice.”

 

 

Posted in WWD! | 38 Comments »

38 Responses to “I Pledge Not To Cheat”

  1. Makiki:

    First???


  2. Ocean Lover (Ho man.....Makiki wen cheat!):

    I thought I was first........I tink Makiki wen cheat. ;-)


  3. roach:

    You're right BL, it all begins with their parents. The mentality that "winning is the only thing" is driven into some kids by parents that are living vicariously through their offspring. Some people just crave the attention even if its only for being the parent of a talented child.


  4. anklebiters:

    A comment I made on Queenies blog back on July 24..."Booted out for breaking the rules"

    I’ve seen all ‘kinds’ of sports parents as all of my kids played sports in and out of school and I’ve also coached. Baseball and hockey parents are two of the worse…it’s disheartening to see the kids being berated by the parents for failing to meet ‘their’ standards. I’ve seen favoritism by coaches in playing their kids almost exclusively (difficult to do in the younger age group in LL since everyone must play equally but it still happens). The WIN WIN mentality overshadows the real goal of kids having fun, win or lose, social interaction, learning the rules and abide by them, and the team concept and competition. 99% of them will never play beyond high school and the majority that do, will never make it to the ’show’.

    We’ve had incidences of falsification of birth certificates and home addresses for boundary lines. Look at what happened a few years ago at the Little League WS. That sends the wrong message to the kids that cheating is acceptable until you’re caught.

    Here’s a story of how important the game is to an 8 year old - I was doing the video of one my son’s hockey game. I was in the players bench area, off to one side as not to interfere with the kids shift changes. The coach was intensely focused on game, making sure the kids were where they should be, keeping track of shift time…one of the players on the bench asked the coach how much time was left in the game. The game was about 5 minutes into the game so there was another 20-25 minutes before it ended. After several of his shifts were played, again he asked the coach how much longer….this time there was about 5 minutes left in a tie game. ‘What are we having for treats?’ he asked the coach. As you know, it’s traditional for the kids to have drinks and cookies/donuts/cake after their games. ‘WHAAATTTT???’ replied the coached as he was trying to get a shift change completed. The doors in the bench area are heavy and must be latched or else a player running into it will inadvertently open the door and injuries can result. Again he asked, ‘What are we having for treats after the game?’ Coach replied ‘I don’t know son, Tony’s mom is bringing the treats today…it’ll be really good, I promise’. ‘I hope it’s not apple juice, I don’t like apple juice. I want orange juice instead’ was the player’s reply. He’s more worried about what the drinks will be after the game instead of the score or if his team is winning. Pure innocence … I had to chuckle to myself as I was thinking this is how the game should be played, keep the parents out of it and the kids will be fine.


  5. hemajang:

    Well, maybe the patch should say, "WE won't cheat" to include the adults. Yeah, I noticed the patch and the message is good. Kids will get many negative influences in their lives and hopefully the good messages will stick. The most powerful influences come from their parents and adults they respect...you just hope its all positive. But like anything it is all about education and what you emphasize. The No Smoking campaign is a good example of what education can do in influencing our culture. Back in my youth, everyone smoked. I started in the 6th grade but fortunately quit in my early twenties. But now kids are bombarded about the bad effects from smoking and it's working...you still have knuckle heads still smoking but numbers are way down.


  6. NKHEA:

    It's so sad how parents want the kids to play the game, but they don't think about the kinds just having fun....everything is WIN WIN... WWD...
    Were there kuleana fo da keiki's.


  7. B:

    I agree that the parents lead the way. Its our kuleana to lead and teach our kids what is morally correct. sometimes you watch and you wonder if it's the kids like for do-um or the parents make-um do -um. ( yes, many times gotta force the kids cause they don't know better, but...) For find coaches and adult mentors who really "care" for the kids is getting hard. but the positive is get. guys like you BL who teach what is correct is good. Coach Mack has been saying so many times, in coaching you have to have a real passion for people, who really care about people. true 'ohana' spirit.
    to all of you coaches and "mentors" who really care and really "teach"- mahalos plenny.


  8. Ocean Lover (Ex-"Coach"):

    I coached one season of AYSO soccer. I had a team of 6 and 7 year old boys and the comments about the "parents living vicariously through their children" hold so true.

    One of my players was 7 years old and this was his third season of AYSO soccer. His parents had him "practice" before AND after our practices. The kid was REALLY GOOD yet I can't help remember one instance where he was joking around with some of the other boys and his parents became irate.

    The way I saw it was that it was late in the season and the boys were "comfortable" with each other. A little horseplaying during our practice was no big deal as my thought was "kids will be kids". His mom pulled him out of the practice, scolded him in front of everyone, and warned him that if he ever horseplayed during practice again that he'd "GET IT".

    Somehow the AYSO creed of everyone participate and have FUN...........was lost on those parents.

    OL


  9. Ynaku:

    Sad how coaches and adults would do whatever it takes to win. With the HIlo vs Curacao, the Curacao coach tried to use an ineligible pitcher (he threw more than 20+ pitches in a game so wasn't supposed to pitch again for a couple days). Coach got suspended. I don't know if it was hindsight or what. Sure you want to use your best pitcher, yes it was the World Series. But rules are rules.

    Let the kids play and have fun. I missed the Waipio vs Florida game. My wife said it was a good game. The Florida coach knew they were going to lose but encouraged the kids to have fun.

    Like the story anklebiter told. How true about the kids. So innocent. Let them enjoy. I give you credit too BL for instilling in your kids fair play. Even if you guys always get chased off the practice field. :)


  10. M:

    Coaches have been known to "stack" the team to win at any cost.


  11. Scott:

    My dad coached most of my teams, he is an amazing man now that I think about how much time he put into spending with us kids, aside from his hugely importand job. I remember he never ever gave me any special treatment, infact he used to punish me a lot 'cause I was a smart ass in practice. Oh, I ran soo many laps. I for one, appreciate team sports and completely understand their importance, however I would like to have my child also focus as much, or more, on individual sports, like golf, that teach him independence and accountability.


  12. opso:

    so none of da coaches neva have one patch lidat displayed on dem? only da keiki? aigoo...

    in keiki sports.....i notice "mostly" in baseball get choke parents/coaches dat stay all intense, competitive and choke kine serious. WWD! :?

    BL - maybe you should hold one coaches/parents workshop on YOUR philosophy (ho...dass on beeg word) on coaching and how for treat da keiki. :D


  13. Braddah Lance:

    Makiki:
    First???

    Ok. Now wat? :grin:
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    .

    Ocean Lover (Ho man.....Makiki wen cheat!):

    I thought I was first……..I tink Makiki wen cheat. Braddah OL, he wen beat you by a full two hours! :lol: Oh, yeah, you was neck and neck wit him cause Hawaiian time yeah? :wink:
    .
    .

    roach:
    ...that “winning is the only thing” is driven into some kids by parents that are living vicariously through their offspring.

    Then there are others who just use coaches as "babysitters" and no support.... pick your poison. :roll:
    .
    .

    anklebiters:
    (difficult to do in the younger age group in LL since everyone must play equally but it still happens)

    I actually am against that rule. The LL rules state that a player must play three consecutive outs and have one at bat. Normally they play six innings. That means they only play one-sixth of the game... is that "equal"? Only recently (after ten years of pushing and hammering it in from me every year) did our league for the past three years play a modified rule where the players bat the entire order (if you have 12 players they all bat) and no one sits on the bench for two consecutive innings (gotta play every other). Now that's EQUAL. You know how hard I had to fight for that rule?! WWD! And here they were preaching about participation and fun... how do you have fun on the bench? Well, I fight for that rule every year tooth and nail because the "rules" always seem to change with every new director that comes in. We'll see how it goes next season.
    .
    .

    hemajang:
    But like anything it is all about education and what you emphasize.

    Yes! But sad dat sometimes the one "educating" is "teaching" da wrong skills/values. :sad:
    .
    .

    NKHEA:
    It’s so sad how parents want the kids to play the game, but they don’t think about the kinds just having fun….

    I tink boils down two parents in general - those who know their keiki is good and push and push (which isn't bad but should be in a positive way) and those who tink their kids not so good and just say, "it's only fo' fun." Get those in between but generally das how it goes... imho.
    .
    .

    B:
    Coach Mack has been saying so many times, in coaching you have to have a real passion for people, who really care about people.

    I tink dat's wat separates a "players coach" from a coach coach for those who know wat I'm talking about.
    .
    .

    Ocean Lover (Ex-"Coach"):
    His mom pulled him out of the practice, scolded him in front of everyone, and warned him that if he ever horseplayed during practice again that he’d “GET IT”.

    Wat a coinky-dink. Dat's exactly wat happened to a player of mine years ago. We have a team rule dat you're responsible fo' your own equipment and if you fo'get da second time you run half da practice. Dis player (tough luck kid) fo'got and it started to rain so I told him to do pushups in da dugout as we waited fo' da rain to stop. Da mom saw dat, pulled him out of practice and sat in da car. Next thing I know she stay crackin' him. In a mattah of seconds was pau and he came back.... I told him no need finish da pushups. :???: Das da kine "area" keiki I get.
    .
    .

    Ynaku:
    With the HIlo vs Curacao, the Curacao coach tried to use an ineligible pitcher (he threw more than 20+ pitches in a game so wasn’t supposed to pitch again for a couple days). Coach got suspended.

    I remembah briefly reading about a coach getting suspended... so was dem? And I bet you uku bucks dat da coach knew... if not him, guarantee one of da oddahs knew. Pilau.


  14. AC:

    BL, you should start a petition to have coaches take the Olympic Oath as well. Currently, only the athletes/competitors and the judges/officials take the oath.

    More often than not though, when someone cheats, the coach either had something to do about it or knew about it and for the young ones...the parents.


  15. MoOgooGuypAN:

    Gee BL, "cheating" seems to be a touchy subject with you. Could it be the Chinese women's gymnastic team taking the gold that ruffled you up. Yah, you could say they cheated and used ineligable players. Whoops, am I admitting to watching gymnastics? How's that Michael Phelps? Awsome. LOL.


  16. Braddah Lance:

    M:
    Coaches have been known to “stack” the team to win at any cost.

    You don't say? (said in my sarcastic Korean voice) :mad:
    .
    .

    Scott:
    I remember he never ever gave me any special treatment

    Das why I don't tink l'll evah coach my son/daughter on a team unless absolutely necessary. He/she'll get special treatment all right... on da bench.
    .
    .

    opso:
    BL - maybe you should hold one coaches/parents workshop on YOUR philosophy (ho…dass on beeg word) on coaching and how for treat da keiki.

    You like me be strung up, tar and feathered? :shock: Parents, especially parent coaches, don't like to be "coached"... at least from da ones I encountered. I've already accepted on any given team I won't be able to make everyone happy no mattah how hard I try... and if you know me by now, I like to make everyone happy. :???:
    .
    .

    AC:
    More often than not though, when someone cheats, the coach either had something to do about it or knew about it

    I really wondah if there are other professional coaches dat "cheat" but nevah get caught like Belichick?
    .
    .

    MoOgooGuypAN:
    Gee BL, “cheating” seems to be a touchy subject with you.

    Well so it seems... but should it even be a subject if we jus' had decent people in da world? Hmmmm....

    How’s that Michael Phelps? Awsome.

    Yeah, he DA MAN! Da Wife and I was up late to watch dat and boy was it exciting! And dat 41 year old woman swimmer too! She awesome and so humble even though she ultra cometitive.


  17. just an opinion:

    i like the slogan for the patch. it serves as a reminder that sportsmanship is still something to be proud of in your play. true adults can cheat in athletics, but the players can too. maybe the slogan is just for the kids and the adults had to take another pledge of their own as coaches. we all live by a code of ethics and sometimes we compromise them for a greedier goal. the patch helps everyone remind each other that playing by the rules and winning fairly is still important. look how it got us talking about it.


  18. Warrior Dave:

    Hey Lance,

    Someone should send a truckload of those patches to the Chinese Women Gymnastics Team. No way they 16...I heard someone on TV said that some of them still had their baby teeth!

    WWD!!


  19. roach:

    BL,

    Not on the subject but "how com u postin so early now daz ?"


  20. anklebiters:

    BL:

    I've been out of the LL scene for a while so my remembrance of the rules are somewhat vague. So you mean that a player could conceivably play only one inning out of the six and that would satisfy the rules? I can see where you'd be PO'd. We'd always have just enough players so that each could play 3 innings...this was T-ball, so there were always enough teams to spread out the players. My kids dropped baseball to play hockey instead...not a chance of playing the entire game, every game....coaches son or not ....unless you're the goalie :-) .


  21. anklebiters:

    How about that showboating 100M sprinter, Bolt, from Jamaica who eased up the last 20 meters in the finals...this is not the NFL!!! WWD!! He could have timed in the neighborhood of 9.5s according to the analysts.


  22. M:

    What do you think about China's women Gymnast ages? They look under 16 to me...


  23. Braddah Lance:

    btw, I finally found a link on the Little League site about the patch:

    "I Won't Cheat Patch"

    just an opinion:
    i like the slogan for the patch. it serves as a reminder that sportsmanship is still something to be proud of in your play.

    Yes, but why do we need a reminder for something that we all are morally bound to follow? Dat is wat irked me. Da patch should be worn by the coaches, not da players as the players will follow wat direction da coach takes them on. It's sad dat - imho - it just gives da impression dat da keiki cheat.
    .
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    Warrior Dave:
    ...No way they 16…

    I don't know much about da Olympics other then da tidbits, is there a "legal" age to be allowed to compete?
    .
    .

    roach:
    Not on the subject but “how com u postin so early now daz ?”

    Cause everybody been ragging dat I post late. :cry: So I just trying fo' keep everyone happy.... even though I'm up till three o'clock in da frickin' morning... but it's au'good. :wink:
    .
    .

    anklebiters:
    I’ve been out of the LL scene for a while so my remembrance of the rules are somewhat vague. So you mean that a player could conceivably play only one inning out of the six and that would satisfy the rules?

    Ok so you got me rethinking da rule and I looked it up cause it sounded funny upon reading it again. The rule states three consecutive outs in tournament play and one at bat. During the season it's six consecutive outs and one at bat.
    .
    .

    anklebiters:
    How about that showboating 100M sprinter, Bolt, from Jamaica who eased up the last 20 meters in the finals…

    Yeah, I thought dat was so no class... especially at da Olympics! Plus he could have shattered da World record by an unachieveable amount for future. Real no class.


  24. munch:

    i saw that patch on the sleeve when i was watching the Venezuela v. Saudi Arabia game and was wondering what that was all about. sad story when the kids can't "be kids" and just enjoy being active & playing a game because their parents or coach is only concerned about winning. poor ting when they cannot have fun playing a sport because they're too scared to make a mistake & let their parents/coach down. how they expect the keiki to learn & appreciate the really valuable things like teamwork, humility & sportsmanship when the only thing that's drilled into their heads is "win, win, win, losing is bad"?
    maybe the parents/coaches should wear a patch that says, "I WILL LET THE KIDS HAVE FUN" or "IT'S NOT ALL ABOUT THE W"


  25. King Katonk:

    Pretty soon they're going to check what's in their Gatorade.

    Recently I watched a Pony league game and one of the kids practically had a full beard. His talent was head and shoulders above the rest of the players. He even looked older than his coach.

    It makes you wonder...


  26. 9th Island Girl:

    Aw, when I saw the topic, I thought you were promising your wife...


  27. bamboohouse808:

    When it comes to keiki, cheating in sports is something that is learned from the coaches and parents. When I was that age, all I wanted to do was play. Of course, I wanted to win, but I wasn't even thinking about cheating. It's when the ultra-competitive coaches and parents tell the players to do stuff(cheat) and then the players start to think it's ok. WWD!!

    On a similar note, couple years ago I went to my nephew's soccer game at Salt Lake District Park. Had another game going on behind us with like 7 year old girls playing. All of a sudden I hear "F@*^ you ref!" and f-bomb this and f-bomb that. He was pi$$ed off over something and was about 10 seconds from throwing some punches until his gf/wife and some other parents calmed him down. But I'm thinking to myself, how bad was the situation with the ref where you had to go off like that. Was the ref telling the other girls to purposely injure your daughter? I mean, if it was a bad call or something, I can see you yelling something G-rated at the ref. But dropping the f-bomb and almost getting into a fight in front of 7 year old girls. WWD!!


  28. Braddah Lance:

    munch:
    maybe the parents/coaches should wear a patch that says, “I WILL LET THE KIDS HAVE FUN” or “IT’S NOT ALL ABOUT THE W”

    Not a bad idea. I tink I'll print out some home team color shirts saying "It's Not About Da 'W'". :grin:
    .
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    King Katonk:
    Recently I watched a Pony league game and one of the kids practically had a full beard. His talent was head and shoulders above the rest of the players. He even looked older than his coach.

    Ok den, no look at my players. :lol: I'll have a pic either this week or next but I get some pretty big kids to.... but no facial hair. :shock:
    .
    .

    9th Island Girl:
    Aw, when I saw the topic, I thought you were promising your wife…

    Wat fo' pledge to Da Wife wen she says she get sharp scissors... a threat mo' effective den promises. :wink:
    .
    .

    bamboohouse808:
    On a similar note, couple years ago I went to my nephew’s soccer game at Salt Lake District Park.

    Das all you had to say.... Salt Lake. :oops: Jus' joke... relax, I grew up there and still coach there as well. :grin:

    All of a sudden I hear “F@*^ you ref!” and f-bomb this and f-bomb that...But I’m thinking to myself, how bad was the situation with the ref where you had to go off like that.

    Dunno why some parents fly off da handle li'dat. No make sense. Wat dat goin' prove? One day, I goin' turn da tables on dat kine people. I jus' goin' call da game and say "your team wins!" and walk off da field. I wondah wat would happen? Would da oddah team get mad at dat guy or would dey take da "W"? Hmmmm.... social experiment time?


  29. bamboohouse808:

    Ho BL, what you saying about Salt Lake?! Nah Nah Nah. Just kidding. I think everywhere you go, this is one growing problem.

    Peoples just gotta chillax and let da keiki have fun. I bet his daughter never even think there was a problem going on and here he was ready for go all WWE on this poor guy who was probably a parent of one of the other girls on the team.

    As for your social experiment, I think the other team would just think the guy is lolo and take the "W" for their team. Then that guy's team can give him stink eye. Then the keiki can have an earlier start at playing with their friends. For me, that was just as fun as the game itself. :D


  30. al:

    wat?


  31. snow:

    I think the parents and coaches gotta take the oath!! The children learn from the adults - their attitudes and their actions reflect the adult influence in their lives. It's a shame when adults are only focused on winning at all costs - how much fun is that? Sports, especially when children are involved, should be enjoyed and be a means for children to grow physically and socially. There are all kinds of good things that can be learned from participating in sports! Sometimes people don't realize that encouragement and enjoyment can lead someone to excel because they want to, not because they have to!

    BL - My hat's off to you for always trying to do right by the keiki!


  32. BananaFish:

    BL - I think your "social experiment" would get the parents on your team all nuts, and then the bruddah on the other team making a big scene wouldn't really care, as long as his kid's team got the win.

    Oh wait, you talkin' about a parent on your team making a scene? Yeah, then all the parents on your team would still get nuts, maybe half would blame you, and half would blame that guy. Then that guy would want to scrap you, cause all of a sudden you made it HIS fault, an den what?

    It MIGHT change his behavior next time, if there is a next time. He might just pull his kid off of your team, and try put um on a team that "plays to win."

    Oh, something else to add - plenny people talk about learning how to accept defeat with class and honor, but I find the other half is not always taught - how to win with class. Like that Jamaican sprinter. That buggah beating his chest and waving his arms. What a arrogant tool.


  33. masas808:

    right on BL....been reading your blogs for sometime now
    and I'm not a lurka anymore.....


  34. Tankobu:

    Lots of good points made by all those who posted!

    In this day of media coverage it's sad to see how showboating is more prevalent. Instead of copying, youngsters need to learn the importance of good sportsmanship, winning and losing with dignity.

    Braddah Lance, thanks for that link at #23. I always liked Dale Murphy and tho this effort is well intended I think it misses the mark. Like you BL, I think the boys are made pawns in this media play and the adults should be the ones held accountable. After all, action speaks louder than words. You can wear all the patches you like, but if you not trained properly it don't mean a thing.

    Okay, dat being said, Braddah, you been coaching 15 years?! Wat you started wen you was 12? You like dat eh? :smile: Seriously, you must have seen plenty kukai go down in that time. I give you lots of credit. You get da right spirit Braddah!


  35. Braddah Lance:

    bamboohouse808:
    ...Then the keiki can have an earlier start at playing with their friends. For me, that was just as fun as the game itself.

    Funny you mentioned dat... we usually play football aftah every game... tackle of course. :grin:
    .
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    al:
    wat?

    Huh? :?:
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    .

    snow:
    Sometimes people don’t realize that encouragement and enjoyment can lead someone to excel because they want to, not because they have to!
    BL - My hat’s off to you for always trying to do right by the keiki!

    hee hee. Funny you mentioned dat... stay tuned fo' Feel Good Friday's blog......
    .
    .

    BananaFish:
    Oh, something else to add - plenny people talk about learning how to accept defeat with class and honor, but I find the other half is not always taught - how to win with class. Like that Jamaican sprinter. That buggah beating his chest and waving his arms. What a arrogant tool.

    Oh believe me Braddah, my players learn how to act whether we win or lose... at least wen I'm around.
    .
    .

    masas808:
    right on BL….been reading your blogs for sometime now
    and I’m not a lurka anymore…..

    E Komo Mai!!! You know how happy I am to see anoddah Lurkah out?! I thought I was losing some readers. Mahalos fo' "braving" da WWD! world. :grin:
    .
    .

    Tankobu:
    Braddah Lance, thanks for that link at #23. I always liked Dale Murphy and tho this effort is well intended I think it misses the mark. Like you BL, I think the boys are made pawns in this media play and the adults should be the ones held accountable. After all, action speaks louder than words. You can wear all the patches you like, but if you not trained properly it don’t mean a thing.

    Mahalos! I thought I was da only one dat felt like da keiki - or situation - was treated like "pawns".

    Okay, dat being said, Braddah, you been coaching 15 years?! Wat you started wen you was 12?

    You funny.... 12, I was a player coach at 7 - get it straight! :lol: But yeah, right outta high school and at least half dat time coached two teams... in da same season too not including winter leagues as well... geez, I've been coaching a lot huh?


  36. HNL2LAS:

    To think that our world has come to this...... that there is a pledge not to cheat... WWD? What the heck happened to morals and ethics boiyee...I agree that parents and coaches should be taking this pledge and doing it publicly like the kids are/have to! Parents still get the shirts or jackets too right?? hehe....Parents and even the coaches have to set good examples right? 'n BL it looks like you set a great example as a coach, YAY! Good for you for having some morals, and a backbone too huh? I will say there are many people who should not have kids!!!!


  37. anklebiters:

    You've seen those decals on the back windows of SUV/vans where they have the dad/mom/kids/pets displayed....have a patch with the mom/dad with a red circle and a diagonal line through it.

    House league youth sports should be all about fun and fundamentals. Once you start participating in the older-aged travel teams, all bets are off. The 'W' is elevated above the 'fun' - since the goal is to be number 1 - than how much time a player is given on the field. Most programs will tell you right up front during tryouts that equal playing time does not exist.

    Inline hockey's roster is 8 plus a goalie, 2 four-player shifts. On power plays you have your best 4 offensive players out there, penalty kills - your best 3 defense. Most games, the minutes played is not far apart between players. Crunch time, you want your 4 best out there...no different than in any other sport. Win and you move on...lose and ultimately, you're headed home....I think the ride home is more painful for the parents than it is for the kids sometimes....been there, done that :roll: . Nothing worse that being 3 and out, and you still have a couple of more days to kill in the hotel before your plane leaves for home.

    Parent behavior is no different at this level, in fact it may be a bit more tense since the stakes are higher. But you also meet some of the nicest parents and kids, and develop a friendship with them as you always see them at tournaments. Most kids just want to play competitively against/with some of the best players in the state/nation. Bragging rights :-)


  38. Tankobu:

    Braddah Lance, you one real coaching fanatic! Takes patience and love of the game and kids - I no can do dat kine. Good for you!!