Experience Means "Throw Nice Out Da Window"

June 19th, 2012
By

At a drug testing yesterday, I couldn't help but notice the interaction between a nurse and the patients and it reminded me of my orthopedic.

Back in 2000 when I blew out my knee, I was fortunate enough to have one of the top orthopedics in the state take a look. His waiting room was PACKED wall to wall - with people waiting outside as well - indicating he was in high demand. After waiting more than a few hours - rogah, HOURS - I was called up, sat on the exam table for a few minutes - or more - and when he finally came he asked what happened, took a quick look, put his hands on my knee, popped it out and said, "so when did you want to have surgery?"

Yup, that fast, that quick and that bluntly straightforward. It was a lot for me to process in 7 seconds and basically he said if I was going to stay active that I'd need the surgery. Well, that was a no brainer for me.

After the surgery, there were a ton of follow-ups and the same thing happened everytime with his office. I schedule a morning appointment, wait for hours, get seen in the afternoon - or very late morning - then once called in, sit down for two minutes and I'm done. I thought an "appointment" was to specify an exact time to meet? While I understand it's a doctor's office and there are delays but by da HOURS and then only to get seen for two minutes???

Wassup Wit Dat!

I've never had any kine of surgery before so it was "new" to me and you would think that a surgeon would have a bit more tact in realizing that while it may be a common, normal, everyday thing performing multiple surgeries a day, the people having the surgeries don't know what da heck is going on or what to expect.

One day after da uku-millionth visit, I was talking to anoddah patient who happened to be an ex-coworker:

BL: "So how long you been waiting?"
Oddah Patient: "About two hours. You?"
BL: "About two and a half. I just checked in and went out."
Oddah Patient: "I know. Wat for make appointment?"
BL: "You telling me. And then we wait for hours to see him for two minutes and then he only says, "looking good" and then leaves? And then he not even friendly about it!"
Oddah Patient: "I know! Wat kine dat yeah?"

Needless to say, when I got called into da waiting room that day I let him have it. I told him it was already bad that patients with appointments had to wait hours beyond their appointment time but to only get seen for less than two minutes and then just told it's all good and without even a "how are you doing?" doesn't make a patient feel good or comfortable.

Long story short, the wait time got cut down in a sense that a morning appointment meant you would be seen in da morning and we would be in da exam room for THREE minutes now. :grin: While I can't say for certain if he began to be "nicer" to just me, I would like to think dat he is more nice to everyone.

Back to da nurse at my drug testing. She was a real.......... robot - very impersonal, reading off a script tone of voice and sorry to say, a classic city worker who's been there too long - generalizing of course.

Sadly, she didn't look much older than me - which isn't saying much - but does being in a position for an extended period of time turn you into a thick skinned, non-caring, impersonal person? I can gurantee dat she doesn't act li'dat with her friends.... oddahwise she wouldn't have any.

Think about it. When you go anywhere dealing with "customer service", can't you tell da newbies right off the bat? They are the "nice" ones, the cheery ones, the ones who actually smile and willing to help YOU regardless if you're a returning customer or a first timer.

Then an "old-timer" sinks his/her claws and says, "you'll learn".

And so da cycle begins.

Have you experienced any "robots"? Why do "old-timers" - not all of them - turn insensitive? Granted, they have paid their dues but does that allow them to treat the same people that come in for help or service any differently than when they first started? Or is it just a specific profession that generates attitude?

I hope that da WWD! Hui who have been in the same position for many many years no ack li'dat. I've been doing what I've been doing for about 11 years and I too catch myself and then scold myself for being "monotoned" but it all boils down to one thing,

Treat others how you want them to treat the ones you care about....... because how they treat you don't mean sh......








Posted in WWD! | 17 Comments »

17 Responses to “Experience Means "Throw Nice Out Da Window"”

  1. Ynaku:

    FIRST! WWD!

    Wea da Aloha?


  2. Ynaku:

    I went to my Dr's office last week Friday. The nurse calls me in to take the vitals and stuff. I know da routine so we go through the motion. But the thing is, we talk story as she goes through it.

    My appointment was for 8:30 am and I was in an examination room by then. Since it's only to go over blood test result, I sit in da chair so I no mess da paper on the table. The Doc opens the door and say, "Come"

    I go into his office and sit in a chair. We start talking story as he goes over the blood test. "OK your Kidneys good, Your Cholesterol good :D ..."

    Eh doc, I going retire in 2 weeks.

    "That's good so you going change lifestyle then?"

    Yes Doc, I going eat better and exercise more

    "OK Good. Try wait yeah? OK your da kine stay little bit high. You taking your meds?"

    Yeah but I forget take the night time one.

    "OK try wait yeah?"

    Eh Doc? Sorry I was working Waipahu the last 3 weeks and was eating all kine Filipino Food. I no could help myself. :D

    "Nah no worries, I not going scold you. By the way, is Ong Choy Filipino or Chinese? I see um all da time in da Fili[ino Restaurant."

    I dunno Doc, but yeah I see the Filipinos make pickle but then I also see um in Chinese restaurant with pork and Harm Ha.

    "Yeah dat's right yeah? OK I like you take this new meds since you no forget take your morning meds right? So I like you take 2 of this ini da morning. No forget ok?"

    Thanks Doc. I get um.

    "OK come see me in 3 months."

    I like my Doc. He cares and he no rush you. He did tell me that Fridays his busiest cause everybody like something before the weekend. So I asked him when's a good day? He said either Tuesday or Thursday. He said even Monday can be slow cause people get sick over the weekend but they no like go doctor until full blown. So they make Friday Appointment to get meds before Weekend. Strange yeah?


  3. melancholyone:

    I thought you were on soap opera time for a while?

    Did you mean the blog for the 11 years?

    Everything turns auto-pilot for everyone at some points in time.

    I mean, I don't know where you went to get drug tested, but some of those places do deal with an unseemly element, so day after day, watching the flotsam and jetsam...

    It's not always old-timer corruption.


  4. Lowtone123:

    Fortunately my physician is a nice guy altho he always says I gotta lose weight. My experience wit da unfriendly kine is wen I see specialist like wen I injured my back. Jus like you I wait long time to git to da exam room den I wait mo long for da doc anden he look me ova for a few minutes, look ova da x-ray, and says I should have surgery. WWD? Sadly you see many of these people in life. No really care about their job or how they perform it. Look like dey jus going through the motions to collect the paycheck. As fo doctors, I guess some just git you in and out fast and bill as many visits as they can.


  5. cojef:

    Aino hav problems with my doc, in fact i laff at him and he gets perturb but does not show it. He coax me to exercise on my recumbent bike at least 3 times and I tell i will try. Little does he kno i do it every day. But it is a game wit me wen i visit him. Lab workers are all nice, even pharmacy people. With Kaiser in Mainland since december 1990. Ex-fed employee plus medicare all paid to Kaiser so pretty hefty premium for me and wife. No problems had major operation, after operation 5 days intensive care ward, almost died. Retired so no mo peli kea. just take one day at a time.


  6. wafan:

    That is why companies are losing customers and money. Gotta remember the Golden Rule.


  7. MN:

    Is the orthopedic doctor at Queens? And does his last name start with an "M"? Just wondering if it's the same doctor my husband sees. It sounds just like him : )


  8. sally:

    I been in my line o' work for 36 years and I not l'dat. At least I sure hope not. Peoples is just way too darn interesting to be robot to them. Geez, time fo' change job if you come l'dat.

    Just ask someone who knows...


  9. sally:

    Dannnnng, did I say 36years? Some old I stay yah?


  10. wafan:

    Dang, Sally. You been working 20 years before you were born?!?!


  11. hemajang:

    eh BL, next time you get bone problems, go see different orthopedic surgeon. He sounds like Oishi, very good but not the warm and fuzzy type from what friends tell me. I go to Takai, he scoped my knees, repaired a torn ligament on my hand, and go see him for bad back and shoulder. I like him, very friendly and funny. His assistant and staff very good too and don't have to wait long time...only if you have to see him and they gotta squeeze you in between patients then you have to wait a while. Yeah BL, no excuse for having to wait hours every time you go see that doctor...there are other options.

    I like my regular internal medicine doctor too, easy to talk to, his nurse same way, they like family, been seeing them for many years.

    The last few years I been going to doctor's offices and nursing homes a lot, mainly for my parents and haven't had problems with staff or doctors. I don't make it hard for them but you expect the staff to be professional and friendly, or at least have good people skills.


  12. Ynaku:

    @wafan *fist bump* :D


  13. Makiki:

    hemajang - Oishi and Takai???

    I will leave doctors offices if the wait is longer than reasonable and find a different doctor. Unfortunately in Hawaii it seems that the number of good doctors is somewhat limited. My own regular physician turned to concierge medicine a few years ago to reduce his patient load. He likes to spend a lot of time explaining/discussing your situation and this has made it easier for him to do that.


  14. Kuuipo:

    Yes, we all should practice the Golden Rule. I remember taking my Mom to her oncologist and were greeted by the cold ,mean faces of the receptionists. When the doctor came in, his exam was barely five minutes before his foot was out the door when we tried to talk with him. In a recent Newsweek article, tests have indicated how compassion and communication with the doctor were just as important in the healing, in addition to drugs.
    My Mom's doctor and staff didn't help with her illness. She has since passed away, but I have never forgotten the office's cold attitude. Thanks for writing about this.


  15. 9thIslandGirl:

    I can't believe you wait for so long! If it had taken that long for the first appointment, I would never have gone back. My doctors and dentist and their nurses are all super nice.


  16. pandahugger:

    I really believe that not all professions (no matter how much academic hours are required) prepare folks to deal with others. Certain industries (sales, food/bev service, travel) require customer service training even at the entry level. Although I work in the government now, I think the most valuable training I got was working at retail stores, where they teach you to smile when answering the phone because it comes across in your voice. Some people say humbug to that kind of thing, but it really does make a difference with clients and customers. Medical offices (not all, of course) seem to be the worst. :(


  17. Braddah Lance:

    Ynaku:
    FIRST! WWD!

    I guess there's a first time for everything. :razz:
    Da Quote Of Da Day........
    There are no traffic jams along the extra mile.
    ROGER STAUBACH

    Wea da Aloha?

    I've been asking myself dat very same question daily. :sad:

    ....But the thing is, we talk story as she goes through it.

    Supposed to be nice to makule people right? :lol:
    .
    .
    .

    melancholyone:
    I thought you were on soap opera time for a while?

    Wat dat - soap opera? :lol:

    Did you mean the blog for the 11 years?

    Uh, nope. WWD! hasn't been around dat long.

    Everything turns auto-pilot for everyone at some points in time.

    True dat. I just hope it isn't permanent.

    I mean, I don't know where you went to get drug tested, but some of those places do deal with an unseemly element, so day after day, watching the flotsam and jetsam...

    I know wat you mean.

    It's not always old-timer corruption.

    Rogah, not always da case but "corruption" only gets passed down from someone wit experience.
    .
    .
    .

    Lowtone123:
    As fo doctors, I guess some just git you in and out fast and bill as many visits as they can.

    Sadly I heard an unconfirmed mo'olelo dat doctors wit high insurance premiums have to see a certain numbah of clients a day in order to not lose money.
    .
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    .

    cojef:
    Retired so no mo peli kea. just take one day at a time.

    Isn't dat how life should be? :wink:
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    wafan:
    That is why companies are losing customers and money. Gotta remember the Golden Rule.

    You mean the Golden Rule of Business saying to make as much money as you can?
    .
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    MN:
    Is the orthopedic doctor at Queens? And does his last name start with an "M"? Just wondering if it's the same doctor my husband sees. It sounds just like him : )

    Nope and nope. I'm wondering it's a doctor's trait?
    .
    .
    .

    sally:
    Geez, time fo' change job if you come l'dat.

    Well if my boss brought ovah Johnnie's Pastrami's I wouldn't want to leave either. :razz:

    Dannnnng, did I say 36years? Some old I stay yah?

    No comment.
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    hemajang:
    He sounds like Oishi, very good but not the warm and fuzzy type from what friends tell me.

    :roll:

    I don't make it hard for them but you expect the staff to be professional and friendly, or at least have good people skills.

    Exactomondo! It's a profession dat you deal DIRECTLY wit people so why wouldn't you be a "people person"?
    .
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    .

    Makiki:
    My own regular physician turned to concierge medicine a few years ago to reduce his patient load.

    Nevah heard of concierge medicine - wat is dat?
    .
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    Kuuipo:
    In a recent Newsweek article, tests have indicated how compassion and communication with the doctor were just as important in the healing, in addition to drugs.
    My Mom's doctor and staff didn't help with her illness. She has since passed away, but I have never forgotten the office's cold attitude. Thanks for writing about this.

    E Komo Mai back Kuuipo!
    Sorry to hear about your mom and the experience especially in oncology. You would tink dat they would be near da top of da list in compassion and attitude.
    .
    .
    .

    9thIslandGirl:
    I can't believe you wait for so long! If it had taken that long for the first appointment, I would never have gone back.

    I was told he is/was the best and it dealt with my livelihood so I stuck with him.
    .
    .
    .

    pandahugger:
    I think the most valuable training I got was working at retail stores, where they teach you to smile when answering the phone because it comes across in your voice.

    And we can tell wen you fake smile on da phone too. :lol: